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June 2, 2009

Broadband speed restrictions would slow illegal downloads


by David Allen

This issue of file sharing and the illegal downloading of copyrighted material is never that far away, with different plans being putting forward in an attempt to stop those broadband users who persistently engage in the illegal downloading of copyrighted material.

Not it seems that the Respect for Film group, which is backed by the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT), is calling for internet service providers to introduce speed restrictions on their subscribers who continue with these activities after being warned not to do so.

Yet many broadband users would suggest that ISPs are already doing this with restrictions and slow connection speeds.

The alternative suggestion would be block specific sites that are known to distribute illegal material, but there are those who claim that this would not work either.

Story link: Broadband speed restrictions would slow illegal downloads


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2 Comments »
  1. Another laughable attempt by a dying industry to try and reverse their impending demise, why not just ban the internet altogether and we can all go back to the good old days of £16.99 albums and £17.99 DVDs?

    Joking aside I’m sure I’m not alone in feeling absolutely gutted for the Record Industry Exec who has had to settle for a Porsche Turbo this year instead of the Ferrari Spider he so badly wanted.

    Comment by Martin — June 2, 2009 @ 2:18 pm

  2. This made the google tech news column, how boring. The best solution would be to tax or just charge a higher rate for those who download persistantly. The record industry also need to get with the times and stop thinking that it’s justifiable to charge £10 for an album with only 2 good songs on it.

    I also think that there needs to be a platform similar to itunes which puts the artist in control, allowing them to choose the price and give themselves higher profits. Considering the artist onlty gets 10% of the sale from itunes.

    Comment by Tom — June 2, 2009 @ 4:31 pm

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