Tories broadband policy to cost them votes?

Darren Allan

March 18, 2010

The conservatives could lose support at the next election over the party’s next-gen broadband policy.

That’s the opinion of a research firm called Point Topic, which has analysed some of Tories key rural constituencies, so states a BBC report.

The Conservatives have decided to adopt a “wait and see” policy with rural broadband, and have opposed Labour’s broadband funding landline tax.

However, this funding is most needed by remote areas, many of which are key Conservative seats. They will then be left waiting for faster broadband under the Tories, and might not be too chuffed at the prospect.

It’s the Tories hope that the party can persuade private companies to finance the roll-out of super-fast broadband to rural locations.

Otherwise, it’s making provisions to dip into the TV license fund, if these efforts aren’t successful; hence the “wait and see” label.

Could this become a real issue in the upcoming general election, where the Conservative’s lead appears to be shrinking anyway?

It’s certainly a possibility, although another survey we reported on at the start of this month, from ISPreview.co.uk, indicated that 74% of people don’t support Labour’s next generation fund tax.

And the most supported alternative was the Conservative’s plan to use the TV license budget instead.

Obviously that isn’t taking into account the focus on key Tory rural areas, though.






 

Comments in chronological order (1 comment)

  1. Matt says:

    Personally, the whole broadband topic has come under much scrutiny over the past 2-3 years in particular in my area of Sheffield. We live in an incredible technologically advanced country yet severely fall behind our European neighbours with regards to high speed Broadband access. I currently live a short distance from Sheffield City Centre and only have access to 1MB broadband. Following many enquiries to a number of providers, this can’t be improved. My partner lives in an incredibly rural area of Jutland in Denmark yet has a steady 10MB broadband connection. Bearing in mind that we are one of the most technologically advanced countries in the world, it seems all political parties are far to inept to implement any improvements yet will happily add it in their manifestos to attract the vote.

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