|  Home   |  Forums   |  News   |  Blog   |  Reviews   |

May 14, 2010

Net addresses to run dry in September 2011?

Bookmark and Share

by Darren Allan

We could be running out of Internet addresses before we previously anticipated, claims a report published by the BBC.

At the start of this year, we wrote a piece on how the world is running out of IPv4 addresses.

These are the current IP addresses which consist of four sets of numbers – every computer needs one, so they can be identified and located by other computers on the net.

While there are a fair few possible combinations of the four number sequences – 4.3 billion in fact – we’re now beginning to run out due to accelerating uptake, particularly because of the number of smartphones now surfing the net.

Previously, the Number Resource Organisation had estimated we would run dry come 2012.

The latest predictions have shifted that date forward a bit, and according to the article published by the BBC, the start of September 2011 is the new, let’s call it: IP-Day.

Granted, that’s the approximate date on which the last tranches of addresses will be handed out, so we’ll still be able to use those IPs for a year or so after.

But we’ll obviously need a new system in place long before we actually run out. And that new standard is IPv6 addresses, a 128-bit system which offers a massive exponential increase.

IPv6 will in fact offer a rather staggering 340 undecillion plus addresses. A stupidly big number, quite frankly.

Internet Service Providers and businesses need to switch over to this system sooner rather than later, though with the current recession weighing on company finances, it’s likely to be an uphill struggle to find the cash to make the change.

It needs to be done, though, as the worry is that the rate of IPv4 depletion could well increase as this year goes on. Meaning that September 2011 date may start pulling back further.

Breathing room will then become increasingly tight, and companies will have to get their wallets out whether they like it or not.

Story link: Net addresses to run dry in September 2011?


Discuss this in the Techwatch Forums

Related news to "Net addresses to run dry in September 2011?"




9 Comments »
  1. Good to see you do your homework, Ip address length actually ranges from 4 digit up to 12 digits, if it was only four digits that would not give you 4.3 billion combinations :-)

    Comment by A Real Tech — May 14, 2010 @ 8:54 am

  2. What the average internet user needs to know is:

    Will his current system handle these new addresses?

    If not, a software patch of some sort will need to be passed to users before IPv6 comes into use. After all, no company is going to settle for an IP address that the average PC can’t access.

    Comment by Allan — May 14, 2010 @ 9:58 am

  3. A Real Tech… what a laugh… you obviously don’t understand ip addresses.

    Comment by Someone — May 14, 2010 @ 10:49 am

  4. I see you have now edited the article, thanks for listening :-)

    Comment by A Real Tech — May 14, 2010 @ 11:49 am

  5. No probs A Real Tech - realised the original piece would be easy to mis-read so thought I’d better clarify it - Ed. :)

    Comment by Brian Turner — May 14, 2010 @ 12:27 pm

  6. Ummm…

    These are the current IP addresses which consist of four sets of numbers….

    While there are a fair few possible combinations of the four number sequences – 4.3 billion in fact

    1.Good to see you do your homework, Ip address length actually ranges from 4 digit up to 12 digits, if it was only four digits that would not give you 4.3 billion combinations :-)

    He said four sets of numbers not four digits. Homework is good but reading things correctly is better! ;)

    Comment by Joker — May 14, 2010 @ 12:46 pm

  7. >A Real Tech… what a laugh… you obviously don’t >understand ip addresses.

    >Comment by Someone — May 14, 2010 @ 10:49 am

    Then why don’t you explain IP address’s then clever dick who won’t even give his name.

    Comment by Allan — May 14, 2010 @ 1:15 pm

  8. Joker:

    “He said four sets of numbers not four digits. Homework is good but reading things correctly is better! ;)”

    Originally Darren had written “digits” - corrected this to “sets of numbers”. :)

    Comment by Brian Turner — May 14, 2010 @ 1:19 pm

  9. IP-everyday.

    Comment by herp — May 14, 2010 @ 1:45 pm

Leave a comment


Previous: «
Next: »

Visited 1438 times, 11 so far today