Play.com sends out second security breach email

Darren Allan

March 23, 2011

After yesterday morning’s message, Play.com has sent out a second email to its customers who were affected by a security leak, which we received first thing today.

This one contains the official statement from the CEO of the company, John Perkins, which apologises further for the breach. It also clarifies that the responsibility lay with Silverpop, who handle marketing communications for Play.

Perkins writes: “We believe this issue may be related to some irregular activity that was identified in December 2010 at our email service provider, Silverpop. Investigations at the time showed no evidence that any of our customer email addresses had been downloaded. We would like to assure all our customers that the only information communicated to our email service provider was email addresses.”

He continues: “We would also like to reassure our customers that all other personal information (i.e. credit cards, addresses, passwords, etc.) are kept in the very secure Play.com environment. Play.com has one of the most stringent internal standards of e-commerce security in the industry.”

“This is audited and tested several times a year by leading internet security companies to ensure this high level of security is maintained. On behalf of Play.com, I would like to once again apologise to our customers for any inconvenience due to a potential increase in spam that may be caused by this issue.”

Not everyone who shops at Play.com has received these emails, leading some to believe that potentially, those who have got it (such as us) are the ones whose details have been exposed.

However, we haven’t had any spam through on our email address, which hopefully indicates that perhaps our address wasn’t involved in the leak. Time will tell…

It’s always worrying when a company that uses your credit card details springs a leak, which is why Perkins has moved to stress Play’s stringent security.

While this wasn’t actually Play’s direct fault, its investigations of “irregular activity” uncovered nothing at the time last year, which is slightly less reassuring than Perkins’ strong words.






 

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