Motorola wins Apple patent case

iPhones and iPads barred from sale in Germany, but Apple intends immediate appeal
Kerry Butters

December 12, 2011
apple

A German court has ruled in favour of Motorola in their case against Apple for patent infringement.

The Manheim court agreed that Apple is infringing on patents relating to data packet transfer technology (GPRS) through the sale of iPads and iPhones sold in Europe and Ireland.

“We are pleased with the court’s ruling. Today’s decision validates Motorola Mobility’s efforts to enforce its patents against Apple’s infringement,” said Scott Offer, senior vice president and general counsel of Motorola Mobility.

“Motorola Mobility has worked hard over the years to build an industry-leading intellectual property portfolio that is respected by the telecommunications industry, and we are proud to leverage this portfolio to create differentiated innovations that enhance the user experience.”

Offer went on to say that Motorola will continue to protect their patents in both Europe and the US and that they had been negotiating with Apple since 2007 to offer them licensing terms.

An injunction has been issued by the court barring the sale of iPhones and iPads in Germany only and Motorola are also seeking damages.

However, according to the BBC, Apple have said that they intend to appeal the ruling immediately and the products should still be available for Christmas.

It’s not turning out to be the best week for Apple as yesterday Samsung won their Australian appeal to sell their Galaxy Tab devices in time for Xmas. They are also hoping to win a similar case in Germany, where the Tab is currently blocked from sale, but a new model with slight modifications aims to get round that.

In order to enforce the ban in this case, Motorola will have to post a bond of 100 million Euros to cover compensation to Apple should the case be overturned in the future.






 

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